Translate

A little about Playa Zipolite, The Beach of the Dead . . .

Playa Zipolite, Oaxaca, Southern Mexico, on the Pacific Ocean. A little bit about my favorite little get-away on this small world of ours.

Zipolite, a sweaty 30-minute walk west from Puerto Angel, brings you to Playa Zipolite and another world. The feeling here is 1970's - Led Zep, Marley, and scruffy gringos.

A long, long time ago, Zipolite beach was usually visited by the Zapotecans...who made it a magical place. They came to visit Zipolite to meditate, or just to rest.

Recently, this beach has begun to receive day-trippers from Puerto Angel and Puerto Escondido, giving it a more TOURISTY feel than before.

Most people come here for the novelty of the nude beach, yoga, turtles, seafood, surf, meditation, vegetarians, discos, party, to get burnt by the sun, or to see how long they can stretch their skinny budget.

I post WWW Oaxaca, Mexico, Zipolite and areas nearby information. Also general budget, backpacker, surfer, off the beaten path, Mexico and beyond, information.

REMEMBER: Everyone is welcome at Zipolite.

ivan

ZIPO TV

Sunday, May 20, 2018

8 Consejos de Love Mx Para Ahorrar Dinero En Vuelos y Hoteles LoveMXTV

Octopus Shoots Out of Man's Mouth

Streetband playing downtown Oaxaca Mexico.

Caso de violación en Zipolite, no afectará imagen en temporada alta Veracruz Se tiene previsto alcanzar entre un 75 y 80 por ciento de afluencia, en el mes de la Guelaguetza

Caso de violación en Zipolite, no afectará imagen en temporada alta
Se tiene previsto alcanzar entre un 75 y 80 por ciento de afluencia, en el mes de la Guelaguetza


Caso de violación en Zipolite, no afectará imagen en temporada alta: Hoteleros 

Se tiene previsto alcanzar entre un 75 y 80 por ciento de afluencia, en el mes de la Guelaguetza
Redacción: MX Político
Oaxaca, Oaxaca.- El presidente de la Asociación de Hoteles y Moteles, Marco Antonio Díaz Hernández, aseguró que la supuesta violación que una turista en el "Hotel Nude" de Zipolite, en Puerto Ángel, no daña la imagen, puesto que el turismo sigue llegando a la zona.
Asimismo, aseguró que son mínimas las quejas que se reciben contra los servicios que se prestan en los hoteles de Oaxaca. "El tema lo trae la asociación del lugar, sin embargo, es como todo, hay noticias buenas y malas, es una alerta preocupante pero siguen trabajando sin ningún problema", dijo en entrevista al Diario Noticias. 
"Tenemos buena relación con el turismo y en cuanto a quejas podemos decir que son muy pocas y que se concilian inmediatamente", agregó.
Para la temporada alta, el líder de los hoteleros reconoció que la promoción turística ha mejorado, pues aseguró que el Centro de Convenciones ha sido un referente para lograr incrementar la presencia de visitantes de otras latitudes.
De las 6 mil 500 habitaciones de cinco estrellas, hoteles boutique, hoteles de diversos niveles y hostales, que se ofertan en Oaxaca, consideró que en la temporada de Guelaguetza la afluencia alcanzará de un 75 a 80 por ciento.
El líder de los hoteleros llamó al turismo a visitar Oaxaca, a pesar de las advertencias de la Sección 22 de realizar un paro indefinido y plantón en el zócalo capitalino. "Con plantones o sin ellos, Oaxaca tiene mucho que ofrecer, por eso es importante decirle al turismo que los esperamos, que existen las condiciones para que nos visiten", finalizó.
zam


Various Artists - Nano Sonic Sound System 6 [Full Compilation] ᴴᴰ

Top 10 Beer PRANKS

Saturday, May 19, 2018

10 Destinations to completely change your outlook The World Beast (blog) There's a common belief that some places can change the way a person sees things and sometimes even the way he feels about himself. Sometimes these outlook-changing locations are the ones you could expect – the beautiful nature with its mountains, lakes and forests. But sometimes they can be ...



10 Destinations to completely change your outlook
There's a common belief that some places can change the way a person sees things and sometimes even the way he feels about himself. Sometimes these outlook-changing locations are the ones you could expect – the beautiful nature with its mountains, lakes and forests. But sometimes they can be ...




10 Destinations to completely 

change your outlook


There’s a common belief that some places can change the way a person sees things and sometimes even the way he feels about himself. Sometimes these outlook-changing locations are the ones you could expect – the beautiful nature with its mountains, lakes and forests. But sometimes they can be big cities, bustling snapshots of humanity bringing you the epiphanic changes.
And exactly the moment you enter that place, your worldview is dramatically changed. Whether it used to happen that evening you watched the sunset over the temples of Myanmar, or when walking along busy Japanese streets, or perhaps the afternoon you found peace on a beach in Rio de Janeiro.
If you travel to change the way you see life and maybe yourself too, these are the best destinations to go to from yesdates
Bagan, Myanmar
Bagan, Myanmar
All you ever need for your perfect Myanmar vacation is a good viewpoint – an ideal spot to watch the sunset or the sunrise playing with millions of shades over the ancient temples dotting the horizon. There are many outstanding places to witness the birth of the day in Bagan and it is absolutely sure to inspire some deep feelings within you.
Zipolite, Mexico
Zipolite, Mexico
That small village from the tale of Mexican fisherman could probably be Zipolite, a small coastal settlement in the Oaxaca state – precisely the kind of place where you would want to end your old life and begin with a clean slate, buying a little fishing boat and meet the sundown in the sea.
Ipanema, Rio de Janeiro
Ipanema, Rio de Janeiro
A huge realization there? The grandest epiphany you are guaranteed to have? In some cases the crowded popular spots are the best. Sometimes the clichés are not so bad. Just imagine sitting on a warm patch of rock, sipping a fancy caipirinha while watching the sun being born over a long beach filled with tourists, occasional visitors, weekenders, surfers and volleyball players, you will be congratulating yourself for finally reaching this beautiful place.
Mumbai, India
Mumbai, India
No one goes back home from Mumbai unchanged. It’s simply so much there to take in, the pure weight of humanity is just overwhelming. It may actually feel like Mumbai with its wide spectrum of existence is both a magnificent and at the same time pretty confronting thing. Again, you can’t walk away from all that without experiencing a slight change in the worldview.
Berlin, Germany
Berlin, Germany
You will be sure to face nearly the same epiphany every time you go to Berlin. Exactly the realization of the fact there can be another way of living your life, that pursuing a big house, a sportcar and a high-flying job may not be as vital as creating a new original something or spending some good time with your loved ones, or somehow making the world better. Unluckily, all those are so easy to forget when leaving this amazing city.
Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia
Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia
This enormous salt lake in Bolivia is slightly bigger than Italian Corsica might be challenging the notions of your significance on the planet. With almost nothing else to do while there but settle down and stare into the distance, Salar de Uyuni is also a perfect destination for meditation and deep pondering about things you need to ignore.
Atacama Desert, Chile
Atacama Desert, Chile
Have you ever had that sense of completion when staring at the night sky? Beholding the insignificance of our lives in the world we live today and dreaming of other universes somewhere in the infinity. The Atacama Desert can ensure you all of those once you get there as it is one of the best locations to stargaze due to its elevation and extremely pure air.
Esfahan, Iran
Esfahan, Iran
Break all stereotypes about Islamic world going to Naqsh-e Jahan square in the center of Esfahan. There you will notice school kids taking selfies, old men and women walking leisurely and chatting, families playing with their children. And the main thing that is likely to astonish you is a friendly attitude of those people – you will always be said hello and wished a good time while in town.
Shinjuku, Japan
Shinjuku, Japan
All it takes is just one night spent prowling the lanes of Shinjuku, one of Tokyo’s busiest districts to realize that there’s far more to see in the world. Walk a few hours along those neon-lit sidewalks, in and past huge shopping malls and dive into the local culture, visiting some bars and ramen restaurants and watch a whole new part of the world open up.
Loisaba Conservancy, Kenya
Loisaba Conservancy, Kenya
Spend the sunlit moments roaming the local countryside, spotting elephants, giraffes, lions and even wild dogs. Say goodbye to the day lying under the inky blue sky filled with millions of stars right on the balcony of your cozy bungalow constructed in a traditional style. Now this experience is definitely life changing.
Z7 Networks in Seattle, WA, USA

La playa del amor Zipolite 2013 LGBT friendly

Zipolite to Puerto Escondido, Day 6 Toni and Glen's Chatter That's possibly what happened. Most charter airlines to Huatulco and Puerto Escondido come in on Wednesdays and Saturdays. So it would be quite natural for this tourist area to be quiet on a Thursday. Playa Zipolite, according to many meant the “beach of the dead.” As we were told, Playa Zipolite is ...


Zipolite to Puerto Escondido, Day 6
That's possibly what happened. Most charter airlines to Huatulco and Puerto Escondido come in on Wednesdays and Saturdays. So it would be quite natural for this tourist area to be quiet on a Thursday. Playa Zipolite, according to many meant the “beach of the dead.” As we were told, Playa Zipolite is ...



Zipolite to Puerto Escondido, Day 6


Day 6 – Thursday – It couldn’t get any better
Well, we had hoped to get up early and head out, however after having breakfast and coffee at Hotel Estrella de Mar, we did our usual morning routine.  We went  back to our terrace and people watched for a while.  However, today on the beach was a little different.  There weren’t as many people.  They were scattered few and far between.  It could have been that’s it’s Thursday and many of the tourists left on Wednesday and Thursday is sort of the lull before others start to arrive on the weekend.  
That’s possibly what happened.  Most charter airlines to Huatulco and Puerto Escondido come in on Wednesdays and Saturdays.  So it would be quite natural for this tourist area to be quiet on a Thursday.
Playa Zipolite, according to many meant the “beach of the dead.”  As we were told, Playa Zipolite is one of the deadliest beaches in the world.  It is said that in the past, they have had up to fifty drownings a year.  But as one, local person told me, that was the past.   When I pressed more as to why there was so many drownings, he told me it’s because they never used to have many lifeguards.  The waves can be rough, you are warned not to swim too close to the rocks as the surf can slam you into them and that would ruin your day, week or life.  The undertow is said to be brutal if you go out too far.  Add to that it was off the beaten path and of course we heard that many people may be on drugs.
I can say, I did see several lifeguards (some on ATVs), on patrol.  Most days the waves were rough, and there were more people lying on the beach, rather than swimming in the ocean.  There were fishermen braving the waves to climb on sharp rocks to throw nets yielding fresh seafood.  At night, many locals and some tourists would go catch a wave surfing on the west end of the beach.  Toni and I didn’t see any rescues, but we heard there were a couple over the last few days.
After chatting for a while, we decided to go for a drive.  After all, this was our last full day in Playa Zipolite.  The next day, we’ll be going to Huatulco for one day and night, before flying out on Saturday.  
Many of the tourists we met, told us that we’ve gotta go to Puerto Escondido, just about 90 minutes west of Zipolite.  Many tourists flew into Puerto Escondido Airport and drove or took a taxi to “Zipo”.They said it was a pretty drive, but they told us to be sure to get back by dark.
So off we went, taking a beautiful, scenic, windy route, up and down, through a lush tropical shoreline.  Officially it’s Highway 175 out of Zipo (that’s what the local people call Zipolite – it’s the “cool” name and we were feeling cool) to Highway 200, west to Puerto Escondido.  Once we got to Highway 200, the road wasn’t windy or narrow.  It’s actually a modern type freeway, with certain areas, you can drive up to 110 kilometers per hour (about 70 miles per hour).
Toni wanted to buy a hat, and we went back to Puerto Ventanilla, because there was a vendor selling straw hats for 50 pesos (about $2.60 USA).  Sure ‘nuff, the vendor (a lady) was still there and Toni bought her hat, and then we headed back on to Highway 175 to Highway 200, turned left, and started our drive to Puerto Escondido.
We had to take a couple of bathroom breaks, and each time, we had to pay five pesos (about 25 cents) to use the bathroom at a local gas station. Once you paid the peso’s, you were handed a handful of toilet paper.  It may seem weird, but when you have to go a quarter is no issue.  The bathrooms were clean and Toni of course had to note they were much cleaner than her “initial experience”. Most of them had the name Pemex.
The drive was beautiful.  You realized that you’re not in the grand ‘ole USA when you see a pickup truck, filled with people standing up in back, going about 100 kilometers per hour.  That would be totally illegal and probably get you arrested in Minnesota.  What a difference a border makes.
As we got closer to Puerto Escondido, we noticed school children, probably as young as three on up, wearing uniforms.  That’s right, just like many private schools in the USA, the public schools have different color uniforms for girls and boys, to distinguish which school they attended.
We went all the way to Puerto Escondido airport and decided to turn back.  If you’ve traveled with Toni and I, you would know that we don’t usually set a specific agenda as to what we are going to do.  We just “wing it.”  So on the way back, I said to Toni, “Let’s turn down here to the beach and see what’s there.”  She agreed, and so I turned right to Playa Angelito.
We hadn’t eaten since breakfast, so we stopped at a local strip mall that had a restaurant called El Sultan.  It’s a Mediterranean restaurant that served Greek food.  We stayed, Toni had falafel and I had shawarma. We shared our meals and it was divine.  Toni loves Mediterranean food so it was delicious for us both.  Toni even talked me into purchasing a “man bag” from a vendor, passing through the restaurant.
I digress a little:  The local vendors and store owners have some sort of symbiotic relationship all over the area.  Many times when we are at the restaurant, the vendors would just walk in and start to sell their wares to the customers.  Unlike some other countries we have traveled to there is no high pressure.  Toni found it to be very beautiful when they crossed themselves, giving thanks for the sale.
Also, many of the musicians at the restaurants are not hired by the owners.  I noticed they would come up to the manager/owner at the restaurant and ask permission to play.  They would then play whatever music/instrument and then they would ask for donations from the patrons and move on.  Once we were in a restaurant in downtown Zipo, and a third musician came in to ask permission to play.  The manager simply told him that there were “two others were there in the last hour and it wouldn’t be nice for his customers.”  He turned him away, simply because while we were there, he gave permission to two musicals troupes to play, and both then asked for and received donations.  He didn’t think it was right for a third to do that.  That was very thoughtful.  
Back on track:  So we ate at El Sultan and continued our drive towards Playa Angelito.  What a surprise.  The place was hustling and bustling with people.  We decided to stop, window shop and have a couple of libations.  Toni would have tequila with fresca and I would have any type of cerveza.
So we stopped into Mar Y Sol (Sea and Sun) restaurant.  We struck up a conversation with a few people and were told that most of the tourists there were not “gringos” but Mexicans, most from Mexico City area.  In fact, a married couple by the name of Omar and Sandra who are from Mexico City, quizzed us as to where we are from, how we like the area, etc.  In talking to them, we found out they actually met in college in Connecticut (yup, USA), fell in love and got married.  She was originally from Brazil and he was from the Mexico City area.  We chatted for a while, exchanged emails, took photos and said our goodbyes.  It was about 5:15 pm, it will be getting dark shortly and we have a 90 minute drive back.  We were told not to drive at night, it’s too risky with all the unmarked curves.
They were right, when we got to about Highway 175 and 200, it started to get dark.  And guess what, that’s about where the road gets windy, and you can’t see too far.  It wasn’t that bad of a drive, until be passed Puerto Ventanilla.  Even that wasn’t so bad, relatively speaking, until the last five or six kilometers.  The road was dark and windy.  You couldn’t see the curves in the road because there were not many reflective markings.  I had to drive slowly, allowing the locals to pass me.  I was so relieved when I saw the sign “Visite – Playa Zipolite.”  If felt like home.  Moral of this paragraph – don’t drive at night!!!
So, we got back and decided to go to dinner at El Mare in downtown Zipolite.  The ambiance was nice, kind of beach type palapa, cozy and nice.  But that’s where it ended for us.  Toni had the vegetarian ravioli and I had the Filete de Pascado (Fish) a la Plancha. Both came back very salty. The waitress Fatima seemed very stressed and it seemed like we were bothering her when we were using the Google Translator to talk to her. In our opinion, she was very unfriendly. Of all the places we ate, we found her to be unfriendliest.  I told her the food was salty and she just shrugged it off. At one point, we thought would never go there again.  But then after talking with each other we thought, maybe she was having a rough day, we have all had one.  So we will give the restaurant and her the benefit of the doubt.  As the saying goes, “never say never.”
Well, this was our last night in Zipo.  Tomorrow/Friday, we will drive about 80 minutes to Huatulco, another beachside community, about 15 minutes east of the airport.  We wanted to be there, so we’ll be close to the airport when we leave on Saturday.  So, we did what we like to do best.  We came home, got our cerveza and tequila and sat on our terrace, people watching for a while.  Overall, it couldn’t have gotten better.  We had a wonderful last day/night on Playa Zipolite.
We slept in later than usual Friday morning and about 11:30 am, said our goodbyes to the folks at Hotel Estrella de Mar and headed to Huatulco.  We will be back to this lovely place.
Day 7 will be posted tomorrow – Huatulco, we stayed at the best hotel so far.
Video Player