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A little about Playa Zipolite, The Beach of the Dead . . .

Playa Zipolite, Oaxaca, Southern Mexico, on the Pacific Ocean. A little bit about my favorite little get-away on this small world of ours.

Zipolite, a sweaty 30-minute walk west from Puerto Angel, brings you to Playa Zipolite and another world. The feeling here is 1970's - Led Zep, Marley, and scruffy gringos.

A long, long time ago, Zipolite beach was usually visited by the Zapotecans...who made it a magical place. They came to visit Zipolite to meditate, or just to rest.

Recently, this beach has begun to receive day-trippers from Puerto Angel and Puerto Escondido, giving it a more TOURISTY feel than before.

Most people come here for the novelty of the nude beach, yoga, turtles, seafood, surf, meditation, vegetarians, discos, party, to get burnt by the sun, or to see how long they can stretch their skinny budget.

I post WWW Oaxaca, Mexico, Zipolite and areas nearby information. Also general budget, backpacker, surfer, off the beaten path, Mexico and beyond, information.

REMEMBER: Everyone is welcome at Zipolite.

ivan

ZIPO TV

Thursday, August 13, 2015

Irish Times Poaching spree sees tens of thousands of turtle eggs stolen Irish Times Mexico's southwestern beaches in Oaxaca are prime nesting sites for the threatened Olive Ridley turtle, which return to the country's southern coast ...


Irish Times
Poaching spree sees tens of thousands of turtle eggs stolen
Mexico's southwestern beaches in Oaxaca are prime nesting sites for the threatened Olive Ridley turtle, which return to the country's southern coast ...


Poaching spree sees tens of thousands of turtle eggs stolen

Aug 12, 2015
Footage shows poachers stealing threatened turtle eggs, in broad daylight, from an Oaxaca beach, after authorities leave the area to tackle crime in other parts of drug-ravaged Mexico. Video: Reuters
Mexico's southwestern beaches in Oaxaca are prime nesting sites for the threatened Olive Ridley turtle, which return to the country's southern coast each year to lay their eggs in the sand. But there is trouble in paradise for these reptiles, namely from egg thieves.

The sale of turtle meat and eggs has been banned in Mexico for more than two decades, but the threat of a hefty jail sentence has not been enough to deter poachers.

At Ayuta Morro beach, environmental activists estimate that up to 80 percent of the beach's turtle eggs are poached a night after marines guarding the area left in 2004.

"It (egg poaching) is very high because we don't have Mexico's armed forces doing surveillance. PROFEPA (environmental agency) inspectors have arrived but they are limited in that they're not backed up by the armed forces of Mexico. So, during the night we're talking about 70, 80 percent of eggs that are taken," said Angel Guillermo Gonzalez, from Morro Ayuta's Beach Turtle Camp organisation.

Footage taken by Reuters television shows local residents digging at the beach in broad daylight to steal the estimated hundreds of thousands of eggs laid by turtles.

According to Gonzalez, the lack of surveillance on Oaxaca's beaches to protect the valuable eggs is a result of the criminality in other parts of Mexico.

"We had permanent surveillance from the marines here. That means there was surveillance 365 days of the year but since 2014 the surveillance was removed as a result of the (crime) situation in the country because the marines, well it's an institution that is dedicated to helping other states with criminality (problems) in the country, but unfortunately tackling one problem leads to the neglect of others. So, since 2014 when surveillance was removed, poaching has picked up," added Gonzalez.

Gang violence has claimed more than 100,000 lives since 2007 alone.

Subsistent fisherman in the area can reportedly sell turtle eggs sell for up to 15 Mexican pesos (about 90 U.S. cents) each. Locals living on the coast have long eaten turtle eggs, with their illegality having driven up prices.

"We do this out of necessity, the people live from this, there is no other resource," said this unidentified local.

Humans are the biggest threat to Mexico's turtles, but baby turtles and eggs are also hunted by birds, dogs, crabs and sharks. It is estimated that on average, out of 10,000 that hatch, just 0.02 to 0.2 percent of turtles reach adulthood, environmental experts say.

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ivan